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Further Information

Further Information
Natural swimming ponds
Natural swimming ponds have the practical advantages of swimming pools, they also look beautiful and they respect the environment. They are the next step in man-made swimming facilities, combining design, an understanding of how ecological systems work, and the latest technology to produce one of the most innovative and complete garden features currently available.

Water Planting
Submerged aquatic plants live completely under water. They are the oxygenating plants you often see releasing streams of air bubbles in sunlight. Some types are more efficient oxygenators than others. Deep-water aquatic plants have their roots in water that is 45cm (18in) or more in depth. Their leaves stand out above the water or float on the surface. Marginal plants grow in the shallow water around the edge of a pond in planting baskets standing submerged in water. Free-floating plants drift about on the surface of the pond with their roots dangling in the water. Water plants are a must when you have a pond. As well as looking beautiful, they will help your pond to blend in with the rest of the garden. They also provide breeding places for water wildlife, such as dragonflies and fish. By shading the water they help to control the temperature. Their roots absorb nutrients that might otherwise foul the water, and submerged oxygenating plants are the ponds very own ‘air conditioners’.

Where to site a pond
A pond should be sited where you and your family will get the most enjoyment from it. Think of the way the garden is used. The front garden is a good place for a formal decorative pond, but because of all the activity in the area it probably won’t attract much wildlife. The end of the rear garden, where it’s quiet and secluded, is the perfect place to put a wildlife pond.

Water plants are a must when you have a pond. As well as looking beautiful, they will help your pond to blend in with the rest of the garden. They also provide breeding places for water wildlife, such as dragonflies and fish. By shading the water they help to control the temperature. Their roots absorb nutrients that might otherwise foul the water, and submerged oxygenating plants are the ponds very own ‘air conditioners’.

How Much Light Does a Pond Need?
A pond is home to a very diverse and complex balance of plants and animals and needs the right conditions to keep it healthy. Sunlight keeps oxygenating plants working. These plants are essential as they produce oxygen, which stops water turning stagnant and creates a healthy environment for everything that lives in the pond, from fish to plants. Shade is fine for a water feature that does not support wildlife, but it’s not a good choice for a pond with plants and fish. Placing a pond close to trees can cause difficulties. Leaves can fall in and rot, filling the pond with organic debris that will dirty the water. A sunny spot is the essential ingredient to keep a pond healthy.

What Size Pond?
To look balanced a pond needs to be in proportion to the surrounding area. A tiny pond would look lost in a huge garden whilst a large pond would dominate a small garden.

The depth of the pond should be around 60cm (2ft) deep if you want plants and/or fish in it. Water that’s too shallow is vulnerable to evaporating in warm weather and freezing in winter.

Filters
Pond filters are used to perform two vital functions, a. the filter will clean the water in the pond leaving it clearer and healthier, b. the main object of the filter is to convert toxins into substances that can be absorbed by the ecosystem. Ponds without filters, or that have been fitted with poor quality or undersized filters, are usually dirtier, and have more problems with water clarification and quality. Where a pond is only lightly stocked with planting or no fish are present, a well planned planting scheme will act as a vital biological filter and be perfectly adequate for maintaining a well balanced and healthy water quality.

Types of Filters:
• Up-flow waterfall and pond filter
• Pressurised pond filter
• Gravity flow biological pond filter
• Submersible pond filter

• Up-flow Waterfall Pond Filters require the least maintenance and are, in our opinion, very effective. These pond filters are installed at the top of a waterfall, stream, etc and are usually camouflaged with rocks and aquatic plants. Water is pumped into the bottom of the filter and enters a swirl chamber where any debris settles out. The water rises through filter mats, which mechanically filter the water and house beneficial bacteria. Nets filled with more filter media sit on the filter mats to provide even more area for beneficial bacteria to thrive. The filtered water then exits the pond filter over a waterfall weir that begins your stream or waterfall etc.

• Pressurized Pond Filters are also very easy to install and are very popular for small and medium sized ponds. The pond filter is placed in-line between the pump and the waterfall. Most can be buried to the lid for easy concealment. Pressurized filters do require more frequent maintenance than other pond filters, but new filter designs have made cleaning very easy indeed. New pressurized filters only take a short time to clean by simply turning a switch and without even opening up the pond filter. Most incorporate an UV clarifier to eliminate any possibility of having green or dirty water.

• Gravity-flow Biological Pond Filters are generally low maintenance and perform extremely well for small to even the largest ponds. The pond filter is placed near or on the edge of the pond. Water is then circulated from the pump through the filter and then back into the pond again. Since these filters rely on gravity-flow, the flow must move downhill from the filter discharge into the pond. If the discharge line tilts uphill at any point, the filter will fill and overflow. This makes these filters slightly harder to hide and use above a waterfall or stream. These pond filters are generally concealed using taller marginal water plants and creative landscaping.

• Submersible Pond Filters are best, in our opinion, when used in small ponds. These pond filters are easy to install and conceal. The pond filters are attached to the intake of the submersible pump. Water is then drawn through the filter, into the pump and circulated to a fountain, waterfall or other water feature. The filter must be removed from the pond for cleaning, which may mean wading into the pond.

Maintenance
Maintenance of water features depends on the type of feature you have and of the existing pumps, filters and planting that are currently in place.

Recommended reading on the subject by one of the foremost
‘Designing Water Gardens’ by Anthony Archer-Wills ISBN-10: 1840913363
‘Water Power’ by Anthony Archer-Wills ISBN-10: 1840910216
‘The Water Gardener’ by John Brookes Anthony Archer-Wills ISBN-10: 0711249628

Pumps
There are two main types of pumps:- submersible and dry. Submersible pumps are placed under water to operate. These pumps are more commonly used for standard water features and large ponds as they are much easier and cost effective to install and maintain. The pump is designed to re-circulate water through a UV filter and back into the pond, or simply used to pump water to a fountain or within a water wall feature.

Dry pumps or surface mounted pumps need a dry well – ventilated housing site and are more expensive than submersible pumps as well as being rather noisy. They are commonly used in more complex schemes where several features and filters are running at the same time.

Pump specification will depend of the size of your pond, pool or water feature.

For further information and reading on pumps we recommend
www.oase-pumps.com
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